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How to Make Sausage

Last updated on 7/15/2018

Sausage is a popular type of food that is found all around the world. It's an ingredient that is found in a variety of foodservice settings and is often paired with beer. But in recent years, instead of buying sausage from stores, many establishments are choosing to make their own sausage. Keep reading to learn why you should consider making your own sausage, what components you'll need, and the steps you need to follow to make sausage.

Why You Should Make Your Own Sausage

It is easy to make your own sausage, but there are some other benefits to making it in your restaurant rather than buying it from a deli or grocery store. Here are a few reasons why your establishment should consider making sausage:

  • Making your own sausage is more inexpensive in the long run. It is cheaper to buy ground meat, seasoning, and sausage casings and make the sausage yourself than it is to buy it from a store. If you want to cut your food costs even further, you can also learn how to make your own ground meat.
  • Homemade sausage tastes better. Some grocery stores and delis may use scraps and undesirable cuts of meat to make their sausage with. When you make your own sausage, you can control what type of meat you use, resulting in more flavorful sausages.
  • Preparing your own sausage allows you to experiment with different seasonings. There are a variety of different seasonings and ingredients that you can add to your sausage. Making your own sausage allows you to adjust the flavors, so you serve your customers the best option possible.

What You Need to Make Sausage

The process for making sausage is relatively simple and straightforward, but there are some things you'll need to assemble beforehand. Here is what you'll need to make your own sausage:

  • Meat grinder
  • Sausage mixer
  • Sausage stuffer
  • Your choice of meat
  • Seasoning
  • Sausage casings

If you don't have a meat grinder in your establishment, you can also use pre-ground meat. But, freshly ground meat tastes better and allows you to adjust the coarseness and fat content in your ground meat.

How to Make Sausage

  • how to make sausage1.

    Insert the cold meat into the hopper of the meat grinder. Make sure that the meat is cold before grinding.

  • how to make sausage from scratch2.

    Add several types of herbs and spices together in a separate container.

  • how to make pork sausage3.

    Add the ground meat to the meat mixer. Then, add the seasoning mixture and turn the handle on the mixer until the meat is thoroughly coated.

  • is it cheaper to make sausage yourself4.

    Fill the tower on the sausage stuffer with the ground and seasoned meat.

  • how to make your own sausage5.

    Soak the casings in cold water according to the instructions on the packaging. To make the casings easier to slide onto the funnel, run warm water through them first.

  • making sausage6.

    Once the casings have soaked, slide them onto the funnel of the sausage stuffer.

  • how to use a vintage meat grinder7.

    Turn the handle on the sausage stuffer to lower the plunger. The ground meat will then be forced out into the sausage casings.

  • how to stuff a sausage8.

    Keep one hand near the opening of the funnel to ensure the casing goes on smoothly. With the other hand, guide the sausage onto the table into a spiral shape.

  • how to use a vertical sausage stuffer9.

    When the casing is full, tie the end off into a knot.

  • how to tie sausage10.

    You can choose to twist the sausage to create links or keep it as one long strand. Then, the sausage is finished and is ready to be smoked or cooked.

Making your own sausage is simple, and it's an excellent way to cut food costs and provide your guests with a fresher and tastier dish. So, next time you come up with a recipe that uses sausage, consider making your own. For a visual representation of how to make sausage, check out the video above.

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How to Cure Meat

With the recent increased popularity of charcuterie boards , there come new opportunities to provide your guests with a sophisticated assortment of flavors and textures. By curing your own meats, you can earn the most profits for your business, especially since many charcuterie items include inexpensive cuts of meat. The practice of curing meat also falls nicely into the “nose to tail” trend of using every part of the animal, because some of the commonly cured cuts would ordinarily be discarded. Keep reading to learn more about meat curing methods and important laws and regulations. What Is Cured Meat? Cured meat refers to any meat that's been preserved through the removal of moisture. By eliminating moisture from meat, it takes on new text

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