Warranties Explained

Have you ever felt confused by warranties? Warranty documents use specific language that can be hard to understand at times. We're here to help shed light on why warranties exist and what kinds of things they cover. Click on any of the topics below to jump to that section:

What is a Warranty?

Reading through a warranty's details

A warranty is an assurance from the manufacturer that their merchandise will be free of defects and poor workmanship. Its purpose is to protect you, the purchaser, from receiving an item that contains a manufacturing flaw. Most warranties are issued by the manufacturer, and all claims and transactions will go through their warranty department.

WebstaurantStore may offer an extended warranty on select items. This warranty can be selected at the time of purchase and goes into effect after the manufacturer's warranty has elapsed. The issuer of the warranty, whether it's WebstaurantStore or the manufacturer, will be clearly stated on the warranty document.

Each issuer sets the guidelines for their own warranties, including what is covered and the specified time frame that the coverage is offered. Some warranties last for 5 years, while some last only for 30 days. It’s important to read and understand the warranty document included with your purchase so you are aware of the details and limitations associated with the merchandise.

Where to Find a Warranty

Warranties will usually be included on the last page of your user manual. If you misplace your user manual or warranty, you can find a replacement on the WebstaurantStore website. While viewing the product page of the item you purchased, look for the Resources and Downloads section on the right side of the screen. From here, you can download a PDF of the manual or warranty.

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Defects vs. Damages

When discussing warranties, it’s important to understand the difference between defects in manufacturing and damages that happen after the item has been manufactured. Warranties are designed to cover poor workmanship. They do not cover damages that occur after the item has left the warehouse, either from improper handling during shipping or misuse by the purchaser.

Failure to use your new equipment according to the manufacturer's guidelines is considered misuse and is not covered under warranty. Here are some examples to make it more clear:

  • Using a light-duty mixer for heavy-duty applications and causing the motor to seize
  • Washing dinnerware in the dishwasher when it is clearly stated to be hand-wash only
  • Failure to install a water filter on your equipment when it is recommended by the manufacturer

Damages that happen during shipping are also not covered under warranty. This would include dents, scratches, or breaks that are incurred from dropping the item or improper handling. Instead of making a warranty claim, shipping damages should be pursued through our Customer Solutions team. If your item shipped by common carrier, make sure to note the damages on the delivery receipt.

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One Year Warranty

Types of Warranties

There are three common types of warranties that you will see on restaurant equipment. The type of warranty and the length of time it's valid will be clearly stated on the warranty document. Some warranties begin on the date of purchase, the date of receipt, or the date of installation.

Parts and Labor Warranty

A parts and labor warranty will cover the cost of a technician and the cost of the replacement parts required to repair the equipment. It's important to work with the manufacturer to arrange for an authorized technician because repairs performed by anyone else could void your warranty completely.

Replacement Warranty

With a replacement warranty, the manufacturer will send a replacement item instead of paying for repairs. After you receive a replacement, the warranty does not renew but keeps the same expiration date of your original purchase.

Warranties for Specific Parts

These types of warranties usually cover one component. Refrigeration equipment will often have a compressor warranty that is only good for replacing the compressor.

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Making a Warranty Claim

Looking through filing cabinet

It's a good practice to file away all of your warranties along with the item's receipt so that you know when the item was purchased. The receipt can also serve as proof of your purchase if it's required. If you need to make a claim, the contact info is usually located at the top or bottom of the document. If there is no phone number listed, contact the store where you made the purchase.

After you've made your claim, it needs to be approved by the manufacturer. It must be determined whether the issue is actually a defect, and you may be asked to help with this process in several ways:

  • Send digital images of the defect to the manufacturer
  • Send the entire unit back to the manufacturer for inspection
  • Allow an authorized technician to inspect the unit

This process helps the manufacturer to determine the cause of the failure. If it's determined that a defect does exist, your warranty claim will be accepted and arrangements will be made for a replacement or repairs. Though it may seem like a lot of leg work up front, you will benefit in the long run by receiving brand new equipment or free repair service.

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Warranty Limitations

Every warranty has limitations based on what manufacturers can realistically do. For instance, a manufacturer based in the US may not have the capabilities to send out technicians to another country. When you purchase equipment it's important to keep these things in mind if a warranty issue comes up:

  • If you live in a remote location and there are no authorized technicians in the area, you may not be eligible for warranty repairs.
  • Warranties may only cover a specific distance, and any locations outside of that distance may be responsible for the technician's travel expenses.
  • Technicians are not insured to make repairs in residential locations, so residential purchases are not covered by warranty.
  • Some manufacturers are not set up to provide warranty coverage for purchases outside of the US or contiguous US.
  • Wear-and-tear parts like gaskets or light bulbs that are frequently replaced are not covered under warranty.
  • You may need to wait for an authorized technician to become available.
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Voiding Your Warranty

There are certain conditions that will void your warranty. If your warranty has become void, it is invalid and provides no coverage. Every warranty is specific to the products it covers, but here are some common reasons for invalidating a warranty:

  • Improper installation - Failure to install your equipment according to the user manual
  • Residential use - Using commercial equipment for residential applications
  • Damage from negligence - Careless handling of your product or any misuse, abuse, or neglect
  • Unauthorized repairs - Any repair, alteration, or modification performed by an unauthorized technician

Warranties are like a back-up plan if a piece of equipment fails. They are meant to protect you while also allowing manufacturers to uncover flaws or defects in the manufacturing process. It’s not always convenient to make a warranty claim, especially in a busy restaurant environment, but the outcome will be a great benefit to you if your equipment is truly defective.

Posted in: Company Information | By Michale Ferguson

Should Your Hotel Offer Room Service?

In 1931, the Waldorf Astoria became one of the first hotels to offer room service in order to enhance their guest experience. This service quickly became a hotel standard, until 2013 when the Hilton New York Midtown hotel announced it was discontinuing the service, sending a shock wave through the industry.

Many hoteliers began to wonder if they should have full room service, a variation of it, or nothing at all, and they still debate it today. Keep reading as we explore the positives and negatives of offering room service and how this decades-old service can be modernized to fit the guests of today.

Easily navigate to a specific portion of the blog using the links below:

What Is Hotel Room Service?

Hotel room service is an amenity that allows guests to order food from a hotel menu and have it delivered to their door by hotel staff so they may enjoy their meal from the comfort of their room. Along with the meal delivered on a room service tray, guests are provided with the necessary plates and cutlery. Business travelers, along with international guests, guests with disabilities, and families with small children, are most likely to take advantage of room service at a hotel.

However, the PKF Hospitality Research, Inc. found that between 2007 and 2012, room service revenue dropped over 20% with projections to keep dropping. So in a time with interest in room service decreasing, it can be difficult to decide if you should keep the service or dispose of it all together.

Why Your Hotel Should Offer Room Service

Room service can play a very important role in your guests’ experience at your hotel. Customers may seek out a hotel with room service out of necessity, for convenience, and even for a sense of luxury. Here are some reasons why room service may be essential for your guests.

Necessity

  • Your hotel may be located in a remote area where accessing food 24 hours a day may be difficult.
  • Guests may be traveling or working at odd hours, forcing them to depend on room service for meal options when other restaurants are closed.
  • Some guests may feel unsafe venturing to find food at night on their own.
  • International travelers may not feel comfortable enough with the language to order food from an outside establishment.
  • Guests with disabilities may find it strenuous to go out to local restaurants.

Convenience

Room Service Conveniences
  • Solo travelers may find it more comfortable to eat on their own within the privacy of their room.
  • Business travelers are able to continue their work from their room without needing to pause and go out to eat.
  • Guests who book meeting rooms may find it convenient to also have a food option delivered right to their meeting.
  • Room service allows guests to receive food without having to wait for a table during a dinner rush.
  • Guests won’t need to venture outdoors in inclement weather to locate food.
  • Late comers and early risers are guaranteed access to a meal.
  • Guests are able to save time by getting ready while a meal is being prepared and brought to them.

Luxury

  • The availability of room service is an important element in order to be considered a full-service hotel.
  • Guests may be looking to treat themselves or someone else to a luxurious experience by enjoying a meal in the comfort of their room.

With these factors in mind, you may choose to incorporate a room service option when establishing your hotel.

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Why You Shouldn’t Have Room Service in Your Hotel

Offering hotel room service isn’t always as glamorous as it is portrayed to be. Here are some reasons why you may not want to include room service as one of your hotel amenities.

Cost

  • A hotel will need to invest in a room service staff, heat-holding supplies, meal delivery carts, trays, plates, flatware, and more in order to offer room service successfully.
  • Guests will usually skip on room service due to the cost of the food and surcharges associated if they are able to find a cheaper meal option elsewhere.

Quality

  • Food quality deteriorates and and can leave food-safe temperatures in the time it takes to transport the food to a guest's room.
  • Guests may believe that the food quality is not high enough to justify the price commonly associated with room service.

Customer Experience

  • Many guests may find the interaction with the delivery staff to be a bit awkward, unsure if a tip is required or if they should engage in small talk, and choose to avoid it by passing up the room service option.
  • Room service can often feel unorganized for guests, as meals can take a long time to be delivered and are often incorrect when they arrive.
  • Empty meal trays are commonly left in the hallway for pick up, causing hallways to look messy and unprofessional to arriving guests.

Many guests are put off by room service these days, causing it to become an underutilized and expensive venture.

The Modernization of Room Service

As times and guest preferences change, so should hotel services to maintain a profitable business. We explored some modernization options that can help you save money while also providing for your customers’ needs and interests.

Menu Engineering

If you choose to maintain the standard room service structure, proper menu engineering may help create a stronger allure to the service. Guests are more likely to use room service if it is clearly advertised in the lobby and rooms, as well as if the menus are concise and easy to read. Redesigning room service menus to reflect customer trends and needs may create a better impression of the service as a whole.

High-Tech Room Service App

High-Tech Ordering

Many hotels have added ways for customers to order room service through their website or through a phone app that guests can easily install. This eliminates the awkwardness of a phone call and any other confusion caused by possible language barriers.

Use Your Resources

Most guests will consider breakfast to be one of the most important meals offered by room service. Increase your hotel’s popularity by offering a complimentary breakfast in a reserved dining space. This can prevent a room service breakfast rush and the struggle of keeping breakfast foods at food-safe temperatures.

If you have an on-site restaurant, you may also choose to offer room service during the restaurant's dining hours. You can provide a limited lunch and dinner room service option that operates out of the same kitchen.

Grab and Go

If you do not plan to offer room service, you may choose to add a mini-mart in your hotel instead. This gives guests access to food options at odd hours or when it is not convenient to go out to eat. Another option is to offer a limited grab and go menu that guests can order from and pick up in the lobby.

Restaurant Partnerships

One of the most popular revolutions in room service is taking the kitchen out of the hotel entirely. Hotels are partnering with local restaurants and delivery services to offer food for their customers. Some hotels are creating curated menus that feature food from the restaurants in their area. These menus are priced the same as the restaurant menus with just a small delivery fee added.

With this service, guests can order their food directly through the hotel staff or an online app, and the food in turn is delivered to the lobby. A staff member will then deliver the food to the guest’s room for the customer to enjoy. This option provides guests with the same convenience of room service while eliminating the need for an on-site kitchen and the safety concern associated with delivery personnel roaming the hallways. Although this option may not provide your hotel with additional revenue, it may increase customer loyalty overall.

Luxurious Room Service Fruit Basket

Luxury Boost

Some hotels are updating their room service to be more of an extravagant experience by inviting celebrity chefs and mixologists to prepare the food for guests. They are taking room service to the next level with menus that feature local delicacies and unique options. Many hotels are even going the extra step by turning their food deliveries into a theatrical experience. These luxury boosts usually result in additional social media exposure.

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Before you make your decision on whether or not you’ll be offering room service at your hotel, it is important to evaluate your location and demographic. Catering to your customers’ needs and interests will be an essential element to the success of your hotel business.

Posted in: Management & Operation | By Janine Jones

Are Copper Mugs Safe?

Lined copper mug holding a moscow mule inside

Copper mugs are safe to drink from, and most Moscow mule mugs are lined with another material which fully eliminates concern of copper exposure and copper toxicity. Even with an unlined mug, copper poisoning is only possible if there is a great amount of copper exposure to the body. As we explain below, it is improbable that a guest will be exposed to such a large amount of copper when drinking out of a copper mug at a bar.

Is It Safe to Drink out of Unlined Copper Mugs?

2 unlined copper mugs holding moscow mules surrounded by mint leaves

Unlined copper mugs are generally safe to drink out of, as copper toxicity is highly unlikely. According to a study done by the National Research Council (US) Committee, copper toxicity symptoms only occurred after ingesting 30 milligrams of copper per liter that had been sitting in an unlined, pure copper mug for hours.

This means that a guest would need to consume a liter’s worth of Moscow mules that had been sitting in an unlined copper mug for several hours before copper poisoning is a possibility.

Lined vs. Unlined Copper Mugs

overhead view of one lined and one unlined copper mug

Copper toxicity is not likely for the Moscow mule lover drinking out of a pure, unlined copper mug, but it is impossible to rule out the potential. As a result, some bar owners might prefer to stock up on lined copper mugs for easier upkeep, eradicated health concerns, or compliance with state regulations on lined copper mug use. Many copper mugs that you will find for purchase are copper-plated over nickel, stainless steel, or tin, or are lined with those materials.

Copper Mug Safety

Safety concerns regarding the copper mug were raised when the Iowa Alcoholic Beverage Division issued an advisory bulletin in July of 2017. In this report, the Division notified the public that Iowa would no longer serve cocktails in unlined copper mugs based on the FDA’s stance.

Why Did Iowa Ban Unlined Copper Mugs?

Iowa banned unlined copper mugs in accordance to the FDA's suggestion. The FDA asserts that copper may leach from an unlined copper mug into food and beverage that has a pH lower than 6. As such, the FDA suggests that establishments do not allow copper to contact food and drink with that acidity level. A Moscow mule falls under this category because lime juice and ginger beer both have a pH lower than 6.

However, many states allow unlined copper cup use in bars. Be sure to check with your state regulations to see which type of copper mug to use.


Unlined or lined copper mugs are both unlikely to cause copper poisoning at your bar. To fully ensure drinking safety, make sure to properly care for your copper mugs. When these mugs are correctly maintained, your guests can enjoy drinking from this quaint, special cup for years to come.

Posted in: Food Safety | Bars & Breweries | By Hannah Herrera

Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables in Your Region

When are pears in season? What are some examples of fall fruits? With so many fruits and vegetables being imported from other states and countries, it can be hard to know what fruits are in season around your restaurant, cafe, or bar. Restaurant trends show that customers are willing to pay more for the addition of flavorful and vibrant colors provided by local and organic fresh vegetables and fruits in season now.

Cooking with local, fresh seasonal vegetables and herbs is delicious, healthy, and easy to do with this convenient guide. We've broken down the contiguous United States into regions, so you can see the fruits and vegetables in season in your part of the country all year round.

As you explore, however, it’s important to keep in mind that these lists may vary depending on where you live, even within a certain region. Be sure to research your area using information from your local government or food guides to find what vegetables are in season near you.

Fall Vegetables and Fruits in the Northwest

There is no shortage of delicious fall vegetables available in the Northwest, including bulbs like fennel, garlic, leeks, and onions, all of which are perfect for seasoning dishes or making sauces. If your business serves a lot of salads, you'll also love the Northwest's selection of arugula, carrots, cucumbers, kale, lettuce, mushrooms, peppers, salad greens, spinach, and tomatoes.

  • Apples
  • arugula
  • beets
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • cabbage
  • Carrots
  • celery
  • chard
  • collards
  • corn
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • fennel
  • garlic
  • grapes
  • Kale
  • leeks
  • Lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • onions
  • parsnips
  • pears
  • peppers
  • potatoes
  • pumpkins
  • radishes
  • salad greens
  • spinach
  • Squash
  • tomatoes
  • Turnips
  • zucchini

Fall Vegetables and Fruits in the Midwest

Green, seasonal vegetables are abundant in the Midwest during the autumn months, such as broccoli, celery, cucumbers, kale, lettuce, spinach, and zucchini. There are also plenty of leafy greens available, like broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, and cauliflower. If you're looking for fall fruit, you'll need to import everything you need other than apples and pears.

  • Apples
  • beets
  • broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • cabbage
  • Carrots
  • cauliflower
  • celery
  • chard
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • garlic
  • Kale
  • leeks
  • Lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • onions
  • parsnips
  • pears
  • pumpkins
  • radishes
  • salad greens
  • spinach
  • Squash
  • tomatoes
  • Turnips
  • zucchini

Fall Vegetables and Fruits in the Northeast

Seasonal vegetables are plentiful in the Northeast during the autumn months, and the region ships these products to businesses around the country. Fall fruit is less common, but you'll still be able to find plenty of apples, cranberries, grapes, and pears to go around. If you're looking for other seasonal fruits, consider buying from distributors in the South and Southwest regions.

  • Apples
  • beets
  • broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • cabbage
  • cauliflower
  • celery
  • chard
  • collards
  • cranberries
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • fennel
  • garlic
  • grapes
  • Kale
  • leeks
  • Lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • onions
  • parsnips
  • pears
  • peas
  • peppers
  • potatoes
  • pumpkins
  • radishes
  • salad greens
  • spinach
  • Squash
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Turnips

Fall Vegetables and Fruits in the Southwest

The Southwest is full of delicious crops during the autumn months, including avocados, dates, figs, limes, and pomegranates. You'll also find a host of fall root vegetables, such as carrots, leeks, parsnips, potatoes, radishes, sweet potatoes, and turnips. If your restaurant or grocery store is located in the Southwest, you won't need to import much, which will help your budget and keep your inventory stocked.

  • Apples
  • arugula
  • Avocados
  • broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Carrots
  • cauliflower
  • chard
  • collards
  • corn
  • dates
  • Figs
  • Green-Beans
  • Kale
  • leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Limes
  • Mushrooms
  • Parsnips
  • Peppers
  • Pomegranates
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Radishes
  • Raspberries
  • Spinach
  • Squash
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Turnips

Fall Vegetables and Fruits in the South

Some of the South's signature crops are still going strong in autumn, including collards, okra, and sweet potatoes. You'll also find gourds like pumpkins and squash, along with kale, lettuce, and spinach for salads and side dishes. If your business bakes pies, you'll have plenty of apples and peaches to choose from.

  • Apples
  • Cabbage
  • Collards
  • Cucumbers
  • Grapes
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Okra
  • Peaches
  • Peppers
  • Pumpkins
  • Salad Greens
  • Spinach
  • Squash
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Tomatoes

Spring Vegetables and Fruits in the Northwest

Spring in the Northwest is similar to the Midwest: it's all about root vegetables. From carrots and fennel to potatoes and radishes, you'll be able to prepare these spring vegetables in a variety of styles while also creating delicious purees. The region also offers plenty of cruciferous greens like cabbage and chard, but you'll need to import most of your spring fruit.

  • arugula
  • asparagus
  • cabbage
  • carrots
  • chard
  • collards
  • fennel
  • kale
  • lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • potatoes
  • radishes
  • rhubarb
  • salad greens
  • spinach
  • strawberries

Spring Vegetables and Fruits in the Midwest

While there isn't an overabundance of spring fruit available in the Midwest, you'll have no trouble finding plenty of fresh seasonal vegetables to add to your favorite dishes. Some of the Midwest's signature spring root vegetables are plentiful, including beets, carrots, parsnips, and radishes. Because fresh spring fruit isn't readily available, you'll need to import those items from other areas.

  • arugula
  • asparagus
  • beets
  • carrots
  • lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • parsnips
  • peppers
  • radishes
  • rhubarb
  • salad greens
  • spinach

Spring Vegetables and Fruits in the Northeast

Spring is a bountiful and beautiful time in the Northeast region of the country. You'll find plenty of spring root vegetables in season (like carrots, beets, parsnips, and radishes), but leafy greens like chard, spinach, and arugula are also prevalent. If you're looking for seasonal citrus fruits such as grapefruit, oranges, or lemons for your drinks or desserts, you'll need to import them from the South or Southwest regions.

  • arugula
  • asparagus
  • beets
  • broccoli
  • cabbage
  • carrots
  • cauliflower
  • chard
  • cherries
  • garlic
  • kale
  • lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • parsnips
  • peas
  • radishes
  • rhubarb
  • salad greens
  • spinach
  • strawberries

Spring Vegetables and Fruits in the Southwest

If your guests are craving guacamole, you'll love the Southwest's abundance of avocados. There are also plenty of leafy greens close at hand for salads and sides, including chard, kale, lettuce, and spinach. Additionally, you'll find fruits and vegetables in season that aren’t as common in the rest of the country, such as figs and squash.

  • apricots
  • arugula
  • asparagus
  • avocados
  • broccoli
  • cabbage
  • carrots
  • cauliflower
  • celery
  • chard
  • collards
  • corn
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • figs
  • garlic
  • grapefruit
  • green beans
  • kale
  • leeks
  • lemons
  • lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • nectarines
  • onions
  • oranges
  • peaches
  • peas
  • potatoes
  • radishes
  • spinach
  • squash
  • strawberries
  • tomatoes
  • turnips
  • zucchini

Spring Vegetables and Fruits in the South

When it comes to spring in the South, you'll find plenty of seasonal green vegetables to go around, such as lettuce and spinach. Traditional Southern favorites are also plentiful, including collards, okra, and sweet potatoes. The South is also a great source of spring citrus fruit, particularly grapefruit and oranges.

  • asparagus
  • beets
  • blueberries
  • broccoli
  • cabbage
  • cauliflower
  • collards
  • corn
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • grapefruit
  • green beans
  • lettuce
  • mangoes
  • okra
  • oranges
  • peaches
  • peppers
  • plums
  • pumpkins
  • salad greens
  • spinach
  • squash
  • sweet potatoes
  • tomatoes
  • strawberries

Summer Vegetables and Fruits in the Northwest

Summer in the Northwest supplies a cornucopia of delicious seasonal fruits and summer vegetables, including unique varieties like artichokes, chilies, and garlic. The area is also known for seasonal root vegetables, such as beets, carrots, fennel, leeks, onions, parsnips, potatoes, and turnips. If your business is located in this area, you won’t need to import much during the summer, which will help your bottom line.

  • apples
  • apricots
  • artichokes
  • arugula
  • asparagus
  • beets
  • blueberries
  • broccoli
  • cabbage
  • cantaloupe
  • carrots
  • cauliflower
  • chard
  • cherries
  • chili-pepper
  • collards
  • corn
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • fennel
  • figs
  • garlic
  • grapes
  • kale
  • leeks
  • lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • nectarines
  • onions
  • parsnips
  • pears
  • peas
  • peppers
  • plums
  • potatoes
  • radishes
  • raspberries
  • rhubarb
  • salad greens
  • spinach
  • squash
  • strawberries
  • tomatoes
  • turnips
  • watermelon
  • zucchini

Summer Vegetables and Fruits in the Midwest

Predictably enough, corn is one of the Midwest's bumper crops over the summer months. You'll also find plenty of grapes to use at your winery or sell at your farmer's market. Additionally, there is an abundance of cucumbers, eggplant, squash, and zucchini to incorporate into all of your favorite appetizers, salads, and entrees.

  • apples
  • arugula
  • asparagus
  • beets
  • blueberries
  • broccoli
  • brussels sprouts
  • cabbage
  • cantaloupe
  • carrots
  • cauliflower
  • celery
  • chard
  • cherries
  • corn
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • garlic
  • grapes
  • kale
  • leeks
  • lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • onions
  • peaches
  • pears
  • peas
  • peppers
  • plums
  • potatoes
  • pumpkins
  • radishes
  • raspberries
  • rhubarb
  • salad greens
  • spinach
  • squash
  • strawberries
  • tomatoes
  • turnips
  • watermelon
  • zucchini

Summer Vegetables and Fruits in the Northeast

Summer in the Northeast is bursting with almost every seasonal fruit and vegetable imaginable. If your restaurant or bakery sells pie, you’ll love having apples, blueberries, cherries, peaches, rhubarb, and strawberries close at hand. You'll also find a host of other perennial produce favorites, including brussel sprouts, eggplant, pumpkins, and watermelon.

  • apples
  • arugula
  • asparagus
  • beets
  • beans
  • blueberries
  • broccoli
  • brussels sprouts
  • cabbage
  • cantaloupe
  • carrots
  • cauliflower
  • celery
  • chard
  • cherries
  • collards
  • corn
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • fennel
  • garlic
  • grapes
  • green beans
  • kale
  • leeks
  • lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • nectarines
  • okra
  • onions
  • peaches
  • pears
  • peas
  • peppers
  • plums
  • potatoes
  • pumpkins
  • radishes
  • raspberries
  • rhubarb
  • salad greens
  • spinach
  • squash
  • strawberries
  • sweet potatoes
  • tomatoes
  • turnips
  • watermelon
  • zucchini

Summer Vegetables and Fruits in the Southwest

Summer in the Southwest is all about summer fruit, including apples, blueberries, grapes, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums, raspberries, and watermelon. Pomegranates are also plentiful in the region during the summer months. These states are perhaps best known for their chilies, which come in a variety of types and are perfect for use in any spicy dish.

  • apples
  • arugula
  • blueberries
  • cantaloupe
  • chili-pepper
  • corn
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • figs
  • garlic
  • grapes
  • green beans
  • leeks
  • mushrooms
  • nectarines
  • okra
  • onions
  • peaches
  • pears
  • peppers
  • plums
  • pomegranates
  • potatoes
  • pumpkins
  • raspberries
  • squash
  • tomatoes
  • watermelon
  • zucchini

Summer Vegetables and Fruits in the South

The South is jam-packed with vegetables in season during the summer months, including asparagus, cabbage, cauliflower, green beans, peas, and tomatoes. Your guests will also love the delicious seasonal fruits available in the South over the summer, such as peaches and plums.

  • apples
  • asparagus
  • beets
  • blueberries
  • cabbage
  • cantaloupe
  • cauliflower
  • collards
  • corn
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • figs
  • grapes
  • green beans
  • okra
  • oranges
  • peaches
  • peas
  • peppers
  • plums
  • potatoes
  • pumpkins
  • raspberries
  • salad greens
  • spinach
  • squash
  • sweet potatoes
  • tomatoes
  • watermelon

Winter Vegetables and Fruits in the Northwest

The Northwest is one of the best places to procure winter root vegetables, as they have plenty of beets, carrots, fennel, leeks, parsnips, potatoes, and turnips to go around. The region also has clementines, a unique winter citrus fruit that is a popular item in grocery stores nationwide.

  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Chard
  • collards
  • kale
  • Leeks
  • Mushrooms
  • Parsnips
  • salad greens
  • Squash
  • turnips

Winter Vegetables and Fruits in the Midwest

Like the Northeast, there aren't many winter fruits and seasonal vegetables to choose from during the cold months in the Midwest. You'll need to import everything other than mushrooms, which are always bountiful.

  • Mushrooms

Winter Vegetables and Fruits in the Northeast

The Northeast doesn't have much to offer over the winter months due to snow and cold temperatures, so you'll need to import all of your winter fruits and vegetables other than mushrooms and parsnips.

  • Mushrooms
  • Parsnips

Winter Vegetables and Fruits in the Southwest

If your business needs citrus over the winter months, the Southwest is your best bet. Boasting everything from grapefruit and lemons to oranges and tangerines, this region also produces delicious strawberries. Additionally, you'll find plenty of avocados for your Mexican restaurant and broccoli, carrots, and cauliflower for vegetable medleys.

  • Arugula
  • Avocados
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Chard
  • collards
  • Garlic
  • grapefruit
  • kale
  • Leeks
  • lettuce
  • Lemons
  • Mushrooms
  • oranges
  • Parsnips
  • Radishes
  • spinach
  • Squash
  • strawberries
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • tangerines
  • turnips

Winter Vegetables and Fruits in the South

Citrus is abundant in the South during the winter, with grapefruit and oranges leading the way. You'll also find a variety of leafy greens, including collards, kale, lettuce, and spinach. Apples are plentiful, too, which is good news for restaurants and bakeries.

  • apples
  • collards
  • grapefruit
  • kale
  • lettuce
  • oranges
  • salad greens
  • spinach
Posted in: Eco-Friendly Tips | Menu Tips | Seasonal | By Nora Fulmer
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